Announcement – Haz-Waste and E-Waste Collection

Pala, CA – The Pala Transfer Station announces the Haz-Waste and E-Waste Collection event that will take place from Monday, October 15, 2018, to Saturday, October 20, 2018, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Haz-Waste and E-Waste Collection
Monday, October 15, 2018 to Saturday, October 20, 2018
9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Pala Transfer Station

Please see the attached flyer and post in your area or forward to those interested.

For more information call the Pala Transfer Station: 760-742-1781.

Pala’s Annual Water Quality Report

Every year, all public waters supply systems must develop and send out a CCR (Consumer Confidence Report), which describes the water quality of their system’s tap water. This report must be delivered by June 30th of each year. The report covers Pala’s drinking (tap) water quality from January 1st, 2017 to December 31st, 2017. We had no violations last year, as you can see from the chart on pages 4 through 7. Click here to access the report, which is posted on the Pala tribe website. You can also find it in the Documents section of the Pala website.

Also, if you live outside of Pala, look for your own CCR’s either in your water billing statements or on your water district’s website (see below for maps of other local water districts in case you are unsure of the district you live in). If anyone wants help finding/reading the results of their own water district, feel free to come by the Pala Environmental Department office in the Administration Building and we will be glad to help you find and read your own CCR.

If you have any questions about Pala’s water quality, please feel free to call or email our water quality specialist, Heidi Brow, at 760-891-3514 or hbrow@palatribe.com.

 

Adapting to Climate Change

Here in beautiful Pala, we are blessed to have blue skies, green valleys, and tall mountain peaks to enjoy, along with mild southern California weather. But that doesn’t mean we are immune from the effects of climate change. Human activity has poured untold quantities of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, into the atmosphere. These gases trap heat and prevent it from escaping into space, which results in Mother Earth getting overheated – just like a greenhouse. This greenhouse effect causes global warming, which in turn causes changes in long-term weather patterns – in other words, climate change. Climate change affects more than just the weather – along with more extreme weather events, we can also expect to see more drought, higher summertime temperatures, changes in plants, impacts to animals, and more. The direct affects on people include exposure to disease from pests such as rodents and mosquitoes, uncertainty or insecurity in our food supply, higher risks to water sources – including water from wells here in Pala – and increased rates of allergies, asthma, and more.

If this all seems scary, it should – but that doesn’t mean that we can’t fight back! There are many actions that you can take personally. At the Pala Environmental Department, we are also working hard to develop a Climate Adaptation Plan (CAP). This is where YOU come in. If you are a member of the Pala community, we need your help with developing the CAP. Come to our community meeting on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at 3 pm at the Pala Administration Building and learn more about climate change risks, and tell us what YOU want to see in the CAP. Climate change is happening, but with your help, we can make sure that Pala survives and thrives.

Spring Recycling Challenge

Join us in Pala’s Spring Recycling Challenge!  You can help fund Pala’s youth garden at the Pala Youth Center just by recycling more in your curbside blue bins and around the reservation, or by dropping it off at the transfer station.  It’s as simple as that!

We are asking the Pala Community to step up their home recycling now through June 15th – if we can increase the amount we currently recycle and reduce the amount of trash that we send to the landfill, we will give the extra revenue to our young gardeners at the Pala Youth Center for garden supplies and t-shirts for the kids.  This is money that they can use on tools, seeds, compost supplies, and anything else they might need for their beautiful garden.

Last year, the tribe spent over $267,000 on trash disposal; almost 25% of that could have been  put in your blue recycling bin (much cheaper to get rid of) instead of your trash can!  If all of our tribal members recycled just 2 bottles a day, we could divert over 670,000 bottles a year from the landfill, ultimately saving the tribe $35,000!  Keeping trash disposal costs down by recycling can help the tribe spend its valuable money on other programs.

Here’s what you can put in your recycling bin at home:

  • CANS – aluminum, steel, or tin
  • GLASS – bottles/jars, all colors
  • CARDBOARD & PAPER – all types, paper bags, magazines/newspapers, junkmail
  • PLASTIC – marked #1-7 or labeled “CA Redemption Value”
  • Styrofoam – just packing containers, not food containers

Please DO NOT INCLUDE: dishes, plastic bags, used paper plates/cups/towels, packing peanuts.

Need a handy reminder of what you can recycle? Visit the Pala Environmental Department for a magnet with a list of what you can put in your blue bin, or go to our website, ped.palatribe.com, and click on “Transfer Station.” All the information you need is right there!

There’s a bunch of other stuff that you can bring to the Pala Transfer Station for recycling as well, including: old shoes/clothes, green waste from your yard, scrap metal, electronic or e-waste, old appliances, and household hazardous materials (for example: old paint cans or cleaning solutions).

You can follow along with our community’s recycling progress by checking the Pala Environmental Department website, or at upcoming General Council meetings.

Bee Smart, Bee Safe

Bees – honeybees, bumblebees, and other native bees – are critical to healthy wildlands and crop production. Normally, bees in the garden are not a problem. But… large swarms can be dangerous! Even a single sting can be dangerous to someone with allergies to bee venom.

OUR NATIVE BEES

Pala has a LOT of different kinds of bees. Most people are familiar with the honeybee (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombus species), but there are dozens of other species of bees locally. Honeybees were brought from Europe for honey production and crop pollination, so are not native to the area. Most of Pala’s native bees live singly or in loose groups instead of colonies. Generally, honeybees are the most common to cause problems as they are often found around people and agriculture; used for pollination in fields and orchards; and live in large colonies. BEES DO NOT WANT TO ATTACK! Bees, even Africanized honeybees (“killer bees”) only sting if they are defending their hive or are provoked. Most stings are because a bee is stepped on, swatted, or someone is trying to remove a hive.

KEEPING BEES AWAY

Most bees are attracted to dripping water, wet areas, and sweet liquids. Fixing leaking outdoor faucets and removing standing water from kiddie pools and other backyard items can prevent large groups of bees from entering your yard (and help prevent mosquitoes as well). Covering pools and other water sources when not in use can also stop bees from coming to your water source.

Bees may be found in large swarms around recycling. Bees like nectar and other sweet liquids, including soda! Keeping recycling in covered cans, closed bags, and away from areas where children play can help prevent incidents with bees. Also, be sure to clean up spilled sweet drinks outside on warm days to stop bees – and ants – from finding it.

ATTRACTING BENEFICIAL BEES

What if you want to attract beneficial bees to your yard? Bees are useful for pollinating lots of garden flowers and food plants, and are important parts of our natural world.

Planting a wide variety of native flowers and shrubs in the yard can attract native bees. Try to plant a garden that has blooming flowers that provide nectar and pollen through all seasons, especially spring and fall. Our native bees need a variety of nesting sites, including dead plants and open, sandy soil spots.

Stop by the Pala Environmental Department for tips on SAFELY building a yard and garden for pollinators!

HELP! I HAVE A BEE PROBLEM!

If you have a bee issue, the first task is to see if there’s a reason you have a problem. Are the bees being attracted to a certain water source or heavily blooming tree? Can you remove the reason bees are showing up, or will it only be temporary – like a flower bloom? If bees, especially honeybees, are building a hive on or near your home, there can be a long-term problem.

Bees can damage structures and walls by burrowing into them and, for honeybees, through dripping honey. Honeybees will also swarm, where a bee colony splits into 2 and a female and a large group of bees move to look for a new nesting site. A swam is usually seen as a large clump of bees hanging on a tree branch or house. When swarming, bees are less aggressive but may still attack en masse if provoked.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Contact Us!

The PED doesn’t perform removals or pest control in homes, but we can assist with helping Tribal members find the services that will work. We can also assist with helping to design a pollinator garden, helping reduce bee conflicts in your yard, and with identifying insects around the home!

If you have a bee swarm or nest that needs removal, the easiest thing to do is to find a local bee keeper. Many will remove honeybees for no or low costs.

 

Pala Environmental Department News California

2nd Annual Riparian Workshop

Pala’s second annual riparian workshop was a resounding success! We had a great turnout and a wealth of terrific presentations. We haven’t received copies of every presentation, but the ones that we have are linked below after the presenter’s contact information. You can find the sign-in sheet with contact information for all our participants here. And the list of Pala’s native plants is here. Here is the list of presenters and links to their presentations, if we have them.

Day 1

Kurt Broz – Intro / Pala HCP – kbroz@palatribe.com  Presentation

Shasta Gaughen – Traditional Use Riparian Plants – sgaughen@palatribe.com  Presentation

Dave Roberts – Climate Smart Riparian Restoration: Planning for the Future – droberts@riverpartners.org

Winston Vickers – Mountain Lions – twinstonvickers@gmail.com

Tonya Moore – Permitting: The Story of Earl – tonya@ironwoodbio.com

Melanie Tymes – River Regulations / Army Corps of Engineers – melanie.b.tymes@usace.gov

Shea O’Keefe (with Pedro Torres) – NRCS Funding – shea.okeefe@ca.usda.gov (pedro.torres@ca.usda.govPresentation

Chris McDonald – Riparian Weed Management – cjmcdonald@ucanr.edu

Amber Pairis (with Danielle Bourdreau) – Climate and Conservation / Tijuana River Estuary / Climate Science Alliance – amber.pairis@wildlife.ca.gov (dboudreau@trnerr.orgPresentation 1  Presentation 2

Day 2

Norrie Robbins – Geology – norrierobbins@cox.net

Mike Kelly – Tools of the Trade   – mkelly1@san.rr.com

James Law – Herbicide Sprayer / Restoration – jlaw@sawatershed.org

Carolyn Martus (with Jessie Vinje) – Plant Identification – carolynmartus@gmail.com (jvinje74@gmail.com)

Kurt Broz – Wildlife Survey Techniques – kbroz@palatribe.com

Colin Lee – Camp Pendleton Program Overview – colin.lee1@usmc.mil

Kyle McCann (with Joseph Kean) – Camp Pendleton Spadefoot Toad Surveys – kmccann@vernadero.com (joseph@tierradata.com)

Dan Cayan – Climate Variability and Possible Climate Change in Southern California – (dcayan@ucsd.eduPresentation

Terry Gaughen – Invasive Species of the San Diego River – (contact Shasta Gaughen; he doesn’t have e-mail)  Presentation

Pala Environmental Department News California

Fall Projects at PED

As we head into fall, the Pala Environmental Department is working on several projects that benefit our community. One new project we are working on involves the Pala Transfer Station. This is where most of the reservation’s waste gets handled. It costs a lot of money for the hard-working crew at Pala Tribal Services to pick up everybody’s trash, and even more money has to be spent on hauling all that waste to the landfill. In addition, a lot of what we throw away can be reused or recycled. With that in mind, the Transfer Station is expanding its capacity to accept materials such as mixed recyclables, reusable construction materials, and clothing and furniture donations. Soon, we also hope to begin a food-waste reduction and composting program. We will be working with Pala residents to help them separate food scraps from regular trash. We will take those scraps to the Transfer Station and turn them into a rich organic compost for gardens and landscapes. By reducing the amount of stuff we throw away, we not only save money on disposal fees; we also help save the planet! Click here to learn more about what you can recycle at the Transfer Station.

Another area where PED is working hard is climate change adaptation. We have all noticed that the temperatures are getting warmer and the weather is getting weirder. The consequences of climate change can include drought, more severe storms and unpredictable weather events, habitat degradation, impacts to wildlife, and increased risks to human health and safety. We are working on a climate change vulnerability assessment that will lead to a climate change adaptation plan for Pala. Soon we will be asking Pala residents to help us out by completing a survey about your biggest environmental concerns. Look for it either in the mail, at General Council meetings, or at a link on the PED website.

If you would like to be notified of the latest news from PED, you can always visit the website. If you want to be added to our email list, please send an email to ped@palatribe.com and put “PED mailing list” in the subject line. This is a great way to reduce our use of paper! It will allow you to receive the PED newsletter, announcements, and other important PED information electronically.

We love talking to people, so call or come by the office any time!

Pala Environmental Department News California

Pala’s Drinking Water Quality

Every year, the Pala Environmental Department is required to release a report on the quality of Pala’s drinking water. We are happy to share this year’s report with you, which you should also be receiving in the mail if you are a Pala resident. Click on the link to 2014 Pala CCR or on the images below to view the report. If you have any questions, you can contact our Water Quality Specialist, Heidi Brow.

2014 Pala CCR

2014 Pala CCR_Page_1

2014 Pala CCR_Page_2