Announcement – Haz-Waste and E-Waste Collection

Pala, CA – The Pala Transfer Station announces the Haz-Waste and E-Waste Collection event that will take place from Monday, October 15, 2018, to Saturday, October 20, 2018, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Haz-Waste and E-Waste Collection
Monday, October 15, 2018 to Saturday, October 20, 2018
9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Pala Transfer Station

Please see the attached flyer and post in your area or forward to those interested.

For more information call the Pala Transfer Station: 760-742-1781.

Pala’s Annual Water Quality Report

Every year, all public waters supply systems must develop and send out a CCR (Consumer Confidence Report), which describes the water quality of their system’s tap water. This report must be delivered by June 30th of each year. The report covers Pala’s drinking (tap) water quality from January 1st, 2017 to December 31st, 2017. We had no violations last year, as you can see from the chart on pages 4 through 7. Click here to access the report, which is posted on the Pala tribe website. You can also find it in the Documents section of the Pala website.

Also, if you live outside of Pala, look for your own CCR’s either in your water billing statements or on your water district’s website (see below for maps of other local water districts in case you are unsure of the district you live in). If anyone wants help finding/reading the results of their own water district, feel free to come by the Pala Environmental Department office in the Administration Building and we will be glad to help you find and read your own CCR.

If you have any questions about Pala’s water quality, please feel free to call or email our water quality specialist, Heidi Brow, at 760-891-3514 or hbrow@palatribe.com.

 

Spring Recycling Challenge

Join us in Pala’s Spring Recycling Challenge!  You can help fund Pala’s youth garden at the Pala Youth Center just by recycling more in your curbside blue bins and around the reservation, or by dropping it off at the transfer station.  It’s as simple as that!

We are asking the Pala Community to step up their home recycling now through June 15th – if we can increase the amount we currently recycle and reduce the amount of trash that we send to the landfill, we will give the extra revenue to our young gardeners at the Pala Youth Center for garden supplies and t-shirts for the kids.  This is money that they can use on tools, seeds, compost supplies, and anything else they might need for their beautiful garden.

Last year, the tribe spent over $267,000 on trash disposal; almost 25% of that could have been  put in your blue recycling bin (much cheaper to get rid of) instead of your trash can!  If all of our tribal members recycled just 2 bottles a day, we could divert over 670,000 bottles a year from the landfill, ultimately saving the tribe $35,000!  Keeping trash disposal costs down by recycling can help the tribe spend its valuable money on other programs.

Here’s what you can put in your recycling bin at home:

  • CANS – aluminum, steel, or tin
  • GLASS – bottles/jars, all colors
  • CARDBOARD & PAPER – all types, paper bags, magazines/newspapers, junkmail
  • PLASTIC – marked #1-7 or labeled “CA Redemption Value”
  • Styrofoam – just packing containers, not food containers

Please DO NOT INCLUDE: dishes, plastic bags, used paper plates/cups/towels, packing peanuts.

Need a handy reminder of what you can recycle? Visit the Pala Environmental Department for a magnet with a list of what you can put in your blue bin, or go to our website, ped.palatribe.com, and click on “Transfer Station.” All the information you need is right there!

There’s a bunch of other stuff that you can bring to the Pala Transfer Station for recycling as well, including: old shoes/clothes, green waste from your yard, scrap metal, electronic or e-waste, old appliances, and household hazardous materials (for example: old paint cans or cleaning solutions).

You can follow along with our community’s recycling progress by checking the Pala Environmental Department website, or at upcoming General Council meetings.

Pala Environmental Department News California

Spring is Allergy Season!

Spring brings a variety of health concerns, including allergic reactions to airborne pollen and asthma.   Each spring, tiny particles known as pollen are released from trees, grasses, and weeds.  Pollen is transported by wind and when we breathe them in they can trigger an allergic reaction known as Pollen Allergy or Hay Fever.  During an allergic reaction you may feel a number of uncomfortable symptoms such as sneezing; nasal congestion; coughing; itchy and watery eyes; runny nose; itchy throat; itchy skin; hives; fatigue; irritability; and allergic shiners (dark rings under the eyes caused from restricted blood flow near the sinuses).

You can’t avoid the outside world but there are ways to minimize pollen exposure.  The key to preventing symptoms is knowing when the pollen count is high and avoiding outside exposure as much as possible.  Pollen counts tend to be highest early in the morning on warm, breezy days so scheduling your errands or family activities for later in the day can help lessen the exposure.  Pets can bring pollen indoors on their fur, so if you have a pet that comes in and out of the house make sure to wipe off its fur before it comes back in.  Also, do not hang your clothes out to dry outdoors during high pollen days. You will track pollen indoors.

Thankfully, not everyone is allergic to pollen. But if you are one of the unfortunate ones, here are a few resources that can help you minimize exposure on high pollen days:

The Pollen.com website provides allergy forecasts, educational material, weather forecasts,  and has a number of tools and downloads you can take advantage of to stay aware of the allergy  conditions in your local area.

Like the Pollen.com site, Azma.com provides asthma forecasts, educational material, weather forecasts, and has an asthma alert system you can sign up for to be notified regarding your local asthma and air quality index.

Call us if you want more information about pollen allergies! 760-891-3510

 

Pala Environmental Department News California

Facing the Drought Emergency

California is facing one of the worst drought seasons in recorded history, and with climate change and all of our thirsty lawns, it is only going to get worse. On January 17th, 2014, Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought state of emergency for the entire state, and requested that everyone voluntarily reduce their water consumption by 20 percent. Last year was the driest year ever recorded for the San Diego area, and 2014 is looking to follow this record, in spite of our recent rain storm.

Here in Pala, we are lucky enough to get our drinking water from a large aquifer (groundwater) underneath our feet, instead of importing the water from northern California or the Colorado River. However, our aquifer is reliant on water flowing in the San Luis Rey River and storm water runoff to replenish this water source. This means that Pala has a cleaner water source, and we are independent from some of the cut-backs that imported water sources will face. It also means that we are very susceptible to future impacts from climate change, as well as over-pumping of that groundwater from both on and off reservation sources.

The Pala Tribe is trying to do their part to conserve this vital resource, including recycling our treated wastewater and allowing it to replenish our groundwater source and removing some of the water-heavy grass lawns and planting beautiful native, low-water use gardens in tribal areas (ie: Pala Administration, Blacktooth House, Calac Adobe). The Pala Environmental Department is working on developing a native, low-water use garden next to the Pala Transfer Station, which will be open to the community and serve as an example of the types of plants that would be appropriate to plant in our arid region.

Here are some water conservation tips that you can practice at home:

  • Turn off the water while you are brushing your teeth
  • Make sure you have a full dishwasher/laundry load before running it
  • Make sure all of your appliances have the EPA Water Sense Label (low-water use)
  • Fix all of your leaky faucets
  • Don’t hose off your sidewalks & driveways – use a broom instead
  • Only water your lawn early in the morning, and let it run for shorter intervals
  • Use drip-irrigation, or other water efficient irrigation
  • Never let water run-off of your lawn/garden….if it does, you are overwatering your plants
  • Remove grass (uses a TON of water) & plant native, low-water use plants
  • If you do want grass, plant: Buffalo grass, Hybrid bermuda grass, Zoysia grass
  • Use mulch – this helps your garden retain water, so you can water less
  • Install a rain barrel to help water your plants

Contact the Pala Environmental Department if you would like to know more about water conservation.